cover_image-1260274283-54662

Dublin Made Me

By: C.S. Andrews

(3 customer reviews)

13.00

‘One of the most riveting books I’ve read for years.’ – Sunday Independent

Dublin Made Me, the first of C.S. (‘Todd’) Andrews’ two celebrated volumes of autobiography, describes in loving detail the pre-independence Dublin in which the author grew up and provides a vivid participant’s account of the War of Independence and the Civil War. Born in 1901, Andrews lived with his family in Summerhill until 1910, when they moved to the distant suburb of Terenure.

Andrews’ account of the two Dublins of his youth – the bustle, intimacy and poverty of the north side, and the bucolic pleasures of Terenure- is an unsentimental urban pastoral, sensuous and immediate. He describes his schooling with the nuns in Dominick Street, with Patrick Pearse for an unhappy year in St Enda’s, and then with the Christian Brothers in Synge Street. And he gives a rich, detailed account of his apprenticeship in Irish republicanism, from his pre-1916 experiences as a youthful ‘camp-follower of the Volunteers’ to his active service in Dublin in the War of Independence and his dangerous days as adjutant to Liam Lynch, chief of the anti-Treaty forces during the Civil War. Andrews writes dispassionately of internment and hunger-strikes, and of the bitter divide between the pro-and anti-Treaty sides, once comrades-in-arms.

Dublin Made Me is a unique account of an ordinary childhood transformed by war and revolution. Together with its sequel, Man of No Property, it provides an unmatched first-person chronicle of the making of twentieth-century Ireland.

‘The total autobiography adds up to a sharp and penetrating study of the nature of our society. Reading it forces one to stand up and look around.’- The Irish Times

‘Andrews has become an important historical figure, firstly because of his public life … A second reason for his historical importance is his two memoirs, Dublin Made Me and Man of No Property. They are easily the most complete and truthful accounts of what it was like to have experienced that extraordinary epoch in Irish history; nothing else quite like them has survived elsewhere.’- Tom Garvin, Magill

Quantity
Also available as an ebook

3 reviews for Dublin Made Me

  1. Lilliput Press

    “Andrews serves as a keen observer of his times and the movement toward the Irish Republic. His experiences are unique, his contacts extensive, and his understanding and appreciation of the events as they happened are sharpened by his own zeal.

    The lessons taught through the years 1913-1923 are still being learned around the world. The simple humanity that Andrews brings to them serves to help those of us who never experienced those moments to appreciate those who did.” TOM BYRNE

  2. Lilliput Press

    “Andrews was one of the IRA volunteers sent to assassinate the British government’s official ‘murder squad’ man, the RIC auxiliary William Lorraine King. King had been responsible for the abduction, torture and murder of a number of suspects and he was twice acquitted of murder, after trial witnesses were threatened and suborned. On the night he and other ‘Tans’ were to die, King was not at home but was in the dungeons of Dublin castle torturing and killing yet more untried IRA suspects. Thus he escaped assassination.

    Despite the outrages committed with equal brutality by both sides during the Irish War of Independence, and the execution of many Irish nationalists, only one member of the British Crown Forces was ever executed for murder during that conflict. The story of that man, William Mitchell, a Black & Tan, has only recently been told in DJ Kelly’s book ‘Running with Crows – The Life and Death of a Black and Tan’. That Mitchell’s fate was linked with that of King is one of the surprising revelations in Kelly’s novel, which is closely based on fact.”

  3. Lilliput Press

    ‘The total autobiography adds up to a sharp and penetrating study of the nature of our society. Reading it forces one to stand up and look around.’- The Irish Times ‘Andrews has become an important historical figure, firstly because of his public life … A second reason for his historical importance is his two memoirs, Dublin Made Me and Man of No Property. They are easily the most complete and truthful accounts of what it was like to have experienced that extraordinary epoch in Irish history; nothing else quite like them has survived elsewhere.’- Tom Garvin, Magill ‘One of the most riveting books I’ve read for years.’ – Sunday Independent

Add a review

ISBN
9781901866650
Weight 0.5 kg
publication-date

May 2001

format

215x136mm, 335pp