Nov
25
2017
 

    Four years ago, in this same venue, I attended the launch of Elske Rahill’s debut novel, Between Dog and Wolf. I bought a copy, took it home, and read it over the next couple of days. When I was no more than a few pages in, my unease began to deepen in tandem with my fascination. Here, I realised, was a writer who would not spare my feelings – in other words, here was the very kind of writer I veer towards. Rahill’s novel plunged the reader without filter or protection into the loveless sex lives and interpersonal cruelties of students at loose in Dublin city. By the time I finished it, I…

Nov
04
2017
 

An abridged version of Luke Gibbons’ speech at the launch of ‘Nobody’s Business’: The Aran Diaries of Ernie O’Malley edited by Cormac O’Malley and Róisín Kennedy […] You could argue that Ernie always kept his cards close to his chest, even when writing his diaries because one of the first things that strikes when reading these, as Róisín mentioned, is the forthright speaking and trenchant observations could not have seen the light of day in their own time. Ernie was taken to court On Another Man’s Wound and he was involved in a liable case. He certainly would have been involved in many a liable case with the content you see in the diaries. As…

Nov
02
2017
 

  Dublin Book Festival starts this week with lots of wonderful events to look forward to. Come to the launch of In White Ink and Rise Above! Letters from Tyrone Guthrie, and don’t miss Caroline Preston in conversation about her debut novel This Tumult. Another highlight of the festival will be Valerie Pakenham talking about Maria Edgeworth and her newest book Maria Edgeworth’s Letters from Ireland on a panel of Ireland’s Notable Women.   BOOK LAUNCH In White Ink by Elske Rahill GUEST SPEAKER: Rob Doyle Elske Rahill’s remarkable stories are sustained by the experience of motherhood and bring the psychological and physical reality of pregnancy, childbirth, mothering and nurture alive in ways that few writers…

Oct
25
2017
 

What Happened to God’s Policemen All of that by way of introduction to William King’s new novel A Lost Tribe, which charts the role of the priest in Ireland, from his exalted position to one of endangered species. King, who’s a Dublin parish priest and a prolific novelist – this is his fifth novel in two decades -brings the memories of almost fifty years of priesthood and an impressive writing style to his best novel to date. The main character is Fr Tom Galvin who, coming towards the end of his life and on a retreat in his old seminary, remembers the old church he knew, the hopes he had entertained, the realities he had…

Aug
30
2017
 

Bray Literary Festival begins on Culture Night, Friday 22 September and continues until Sunday 24 September. It is a festival for people who have a love of literature and features an eclectic mix of Ireland’s rising and established voices in poetry, fiction, memoir and music. One of the voices featured at the festival is Órfhlaith Foyle. Órfhlaith is the author of Belios which was published by Lilliput Press. The novel chronicles a young man who is researching William Belios, an ex-missionary and once famous photographer. As the narrator spends time in Belios’ house in Oughterard, Co. Galway, he begins to unearth family secrets and a layered past. Órfhlaith’s poetry collection Red Riding Hood’s Dilemma and her…

Aug
07
2017
 

A documentary on the incredible Hubert Butler will air this Tuesday, 8 August on RTÉ One at 10.35 pm. Hubert Butler was one of the main reasons that Antony Farrell decided to establish The Lilliput Press in 1984, after discovering that Butler’s work was out of print. “Hubert Butler was one of the most extra ordinary Irish writers of the past century, as old as the century. He was aged eight-three when it was my privilege to meet him – one of a small handful to whom the word genius could be attached. We worked closely together on three of his five volumes of essays at his home in Kilkenny and my own in Westmeath….

May
11
2017
 

Please join us on Friday, May 12, at The Workman’s Club to launch Hopdance, the autobiographical memoir of Stewart Parker. Edited by Marilynn Richtarik, Hopdance is Parker’s poignant story of an amputee enveloped in its mood of numbed trauma. The writing is masterful, the dialogue witty, full of finesse and immersive description. https://www.lilliputpress.ie/product/hopdance      

Mar
21
2017
 

As British Prime Minister Tony Blair’s right-hand man, former journalist and political analyst Alastair Campbell played a critical role in every aspect of New Labour strategy. Charting the course of British government from July 1994 to August 2003, Campbell’s relentlessly honest, often controversial, occasionally brutal, and always razor-sharp commentary has drawn critical acclaim from around the world. In The Irish Diaries (1994–2003), Campbell recalls the integral role Martin McGuinness played in the Northern Ireland peace process. Although the imposing character of McGuinness was ‘always sizing things up, with a smile that veered from charm to menace’, Campbell admits finding McGuinness ‘impressive’ as someone who ‘made a point and battered it, and forced you to take it on board.’ Campbell found…

The Pilgrimage by John Broderick Lilliput Press Book Cover
Jul
08
2016
 

In honour of our latest reissue, John Broderick’s An Apology for Roses, we’re revisiting another of his works, The Pilgrimage, for this month’s Friday Archive. Here’s why it’s worth your while! It was banned in 1961 by the Censorship Board. They always banned the good ones. It sold over 100,000 copies in the U.S.A. as The Chameleons.  It combines an illicit affair with a lovely… … Pilgrimage to Lourdes! What could go wrong? It’s also got a juicy small-town plot (see below) Wealthy Julia Glynn’s husband is seriously ill, and is being tended to by his nephew, Jim, with whom Julia is having an affair. The parish priest advocates a pilgrimage to Lourdes, just as Julia begins to receive anonymous letters detailing her infidelities. As the day…